Mundan Ceremony

Many communities in India celebrate Mundan as a ritual. It is an age-old ceremony that involves shaving the baby's first hair off his head. It is usually performed when your little one grows one-to-three years old. During the ceremony, also known as chudakarana or Mundana samskara, a priest typically chants prayers when the hair is being shaved off. It is performed in different cultures in different ways - either by applying some curd on the baby’s hair or by simply shaving the hair off. Read on to know the significance of the Mundan ceremony, along with when and how Mundan is performed.

When is Mundan Performed?

The Mundan ceremony is typically performed when the child reaches one to three years of age. The requirement for Mundan is that the child must have his first hair growth. In some families, only boys must shave off their hair. But largely, Mundan is performed on both genders.

Where Can You Conduct a Mundan Ceremony?

When it comes to performing the Mundan ceremony, there are different traditions set by every family. Largely, this ceremony is performed either at a holy place or on the banks of a river. You can also invite the priest at home, along with your relatives and perform the ceremony. Nowadays, parents take their children to a salon to get their first cut. You can opt for whichever method fits your tradition and culture if you choose to do the ceremony.

How Is the Mundan Ceremony Performed?

Mundan is usually performed after calculating the auspicious date and time. On the day, the priest typically starts the ceremony while the child is seated in the mother’s lap. He shaves a part of the child’s hair while the rest of the hair is shaved off by a professional barber with proper care. In some families, the initial rites are performed by the father of the child instead of the priest. Following which, the child’s head is washed with water. Finally, the family decides if they want to present the shaved hair to the Gods or to a river. Either way, it’s the parent’s decision about how they wish to give away the hair.

Tips And Precautions For A Safe Mundan

As the ceremony involves shaving hair from the head, it needs to be done with utmost care and protection. Here are some tips that will ensure you have a safe and successful Mundan ceremony:

  • Talk to the baby’s doctor and confirm whether it’s OK to shave your baby’s hair at the age of one-to-three years.

  • Make sure that your little one is well-rested and fed. This will ensure that your child isn’t cranky or restless as it can be quite difficult to handle during the ceremony. Another thing you should do is to keep your kid occupied with a toy. So, when his hair is shaved off, he doesn’t move or hesitate.

  • Hire a professional barber who has had experience working with children. Likewise, make sure that he uses clean and sterilised equipment to avoid any infections.

  • Once the Mundan ceremony is over, give your baby a warm bath. It helps in removing tiny strands of hair that might be left on the skin or the head.

The Final Cut!

If you are planning to perform the Mundan ceremony, just make sure to take a go-ahead from the baby’s doctor and follow the precautions properly. On that note, celebrate this occasion with your family and don’t forget to capture these precious memories of joy!

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

The Mundan ceremony is typically performed when your child ages between 1 - 3 years. The requirement is that your child should have had his first hair growth.

Before going for Mundan, you need to make sure that your baby’s doctor has given you a go-ahead for shaving your baby’s hair. Likewise, make sure that your baby is well-fed and well-rested. Also, you can opt to hire a professional barber to do the job. 

Usually, in the Mundan ceremony, first, a part of your child’s hair is shaved off by the priest. Following this, a professional barber shaves off the rest of the hair. 

*The information in this article is based on the expert advice found in trusted medical and government sources. You can find a full list of sources used for this article below. The content on this page should not replace professional medical advice. Always consult medical professionals for full diagnosis and treatment. *