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At 7 weeks pregnant, the basic sections of your baby’s brain have developed. The buds of your baby’s limbs have also formed, and even your baby’s eyes, ears and nose have begun to appear. During the first trimester, you might experience headaches and the urge to pee more often. However, despite these pesky pregnancy symptoms, this is an exciting time and our pregnancy calendar is here to guide you through the major milestones along the way. Let’s jump right in with some of the most important things happening this week.

7 Weeks Pregnant: Your Baby’s Development

Check out some of the ways your baby is developing this week:

  • Brain sections develop. Although brain development will continue until long after birth, the basic sections have formed by now. As the week progresses, this organ will divide into three parts: forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain. The forebrain will be responsible for things like reasoning, problem solving, and forming and retaining memories. The midbrain will relay electrical signals to their final destinations in the brain. The hindbrain will take care of breathing, heart rate, and muscle movement.

  • Features appear. Your baby’s eyes, ears and nose begin to develop. Her eyelids form, but remain closed. Buds that will later be her limbs are growing fast, and there are paddle-like hands and feet forming, too.

pregnancy week 7 fetus

7 Weeks Pregnant: Your Symptoms

At this early stage of pregnancy, you might be wondering how far along you are and when your baby is due. These are some of the pregnancy symptoms you might be experiencing:

  • Headaches. The pregnancy hormones that may be giving you morning sickness can also be responsible for headaches. Headaches during pregnancy can also be triggered by fatigue, hunger, and physical or emotional stress. You could try drinking more water, resting more often, and snacking regularly to prevent headaches.

  • Frequent urination. Increased blood volume and hormonal changes during pregnancy trigger the kidneys to expand and to produce more urine, while your growing uterus also puts extra pressure on your bladder. All of this means you might be running to the bathroom more often. Instead of cutting back on fluids, make an effort to drink plenty. Plus, these tips could help reduce frequent urination during the first month of pregnancy and beyond:

    • Lean forward while peeing to completely empty your bladder.

    • Practice Kegel exercises to strengthen your pelvic floor muscles.

    • Avoid carbonated drinks, tea, coffee, chocolates, and spicy foods as these can irritate the bladder.

    • Drink less water right before bed to avoid night-time visits to the bathroom, but stay very well-hydrated during the day.

Sometimes frequent urination can be a sign of a urinary tract infection, so if your urine has blood in it, if you feel a burning sensation while peeing or have a tender lower abdomen, or if you have the urge to pee but only pass a few drops, then consult your doctor immediately.

FAQ at 7 Weeks

What is toxoplasmosis and how can I avoid it?

Toxoplasmosis is an infection that's passed through raw or undercooked meat and cat faeces. Unless you have a weakened immune system, this infection does not affect you, but it could be harmful to your baby. In fact, you may already have had toxoplasmosis without knowing it — if so, you are immune. To avoid coming in contact with the germ, if you eat meat order your meat well done, wash your hands thoroughly after preparing meat, and take yourself off kitty litter duty for the rest of your pregnancy.

What are the chances that I’m pregnant with twins?

Identical twins occur in about 4 out of every 1,000 births, while fraternal twins occur at different rates in different ethnic and age groups. If you conceived using fertility drugs or have a family history of twins, your chances of being pregnant with multiples are much higher. It’s possible to find out whether you’re pregnant with twins or multiples from when you’re about 6 weeks pregnant, during an ultrasound when your doctor will be able to hear whether there’s one set of heartbeats or more.

Are there any foods I should avoid?

While fish can be a great source of protein, some fish and seafood, like shellfish and mackerel, should be avoided as they can be high in mercury. Raw fish and eggs should also be avoided. While eating cheese is a great way to get calcium, you should stay away from soft cheeses, like Brie, feta and blue cheese as they can contain a bacterium called listeria, which could be harmful to you and your baby. If you eat meat, make sure it’s well cooked. Avoid unwashed fruit and vegetables. Don’t worry if you love your morning coffee though − up to 200 milligrams of caffeine per day is safe. Most herbal teas are fine to drink too, however, you should check with your doctor first as some herbal teas shouldn’t be consumed in high quantities. Make sure the water is safe, and opt for bottled water if you’re unsure. You might be wondering whether delicious street food is safe to eat. There’s nothing inherently unsafe about it, however, your risk of food poisoning is greater during pregnancy because your immune system is focused on protecting your baby, so make sure that any street food you eat is from a trusted vendor.

7 Weeks Pregnant: Your Checklist

Keep drinking plenty of water, despite all those trips to the restroom

Make sure any meat you eat is well cooked

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7 Weeks Pregnant: Your Checklist

Sign up for weekly pregnancy tips:

Keep drinking plenty of water, despite all those trips to the restroom

Make sure any meat you eat is well cooked

Sign up for weekly pregnancy tips: